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Installing a TV in the RV's Bedroom.

Like many late model RV's, my fifth wheel came prepped for a TV in the front bedroom. This prep basically consists of 120VAC power, cable outlet, and a mounting location that is sufficiently supported. The area I have to work with is rather small, so I decided on a 19" TV.

The TV has three characteristics I really liked:

  • It was less than $100
  • At 19", it was the right size for the spot.
  • It has a signal strength meter built-in to aid in aiming the antenna.

While the manufacturer marked the location for mounting the TV, it was off by about 6". Good thing I used a "stud finder" to determine where the most support in the wall was, or I would have drilled into thin air.

Still, even though the stud finder suggested a different location, I took it cautious and drilled a small pilot hole to see how solid the wall was. Sure enough, the wall at the marked location was paper-thin.

I used the incredible RAM mounting system to attach the TV. My general experience with TV mounting systems - both in boats and RV's, is that the home type systems are just not adequate for something that bounces down the road or across the waves. The RAM system is different... it can be locked tightly down, and will not budge at all. No bungie cords required here.

The RAM components I used were:

  • VESA Plate (mounts to TV): RAM 246
  • End Swing Arm: RAM VB-110-5
  • Intermediate Swing Arm: RAM-109-1
  • Wall Mount: RAM-D-162

The RAM system uses "C" size balls (1.5" dia), and can support 10lbs. The weight of the TV is 2~3lbs, so the system is sufficient for this application.

I ended up not using the Intermediate Swing Arm, so it saved on a bit of weight and expense.

 


Project video.

 

 

 

 

The signal strength meter is a real asset. It is easy to turn the antenna in the direction of the strongest signal by watching the meter as you change the antenna azmiuth.